Summer Session 2012 - Courses

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Courses

In 2012, PSR's Summer Session will comprise more than 20 one-, two-, three-week, and online courses. Read on for details about the courses that will be offered this year.

See How to Register for registration instructions.

Also, please review all policies on the Policies & Logistics page before registering.

Contact summer@psr.edu / (510) 849-8268 with any questions you may have.



Courses by Date:
July 2July 9
July 16July 23July 30August 6
Courses by Length:
Special Courses:



Courses by Date


Beginning July 2

ethicsIntroduction to Christian Ethics: Moral Decisionmaking in a Postmodern World

Offered exclusively ONLINE
Instructor:
Randall Miller
Dates and Times:
Six weeks: July 2-August 10, online
Description:
Leading churches, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations through processes of moral discernment and decision-making has never been quite so challenging.This entry level course takes seriously the challenges and opportunities for doing Christian Ethics in a Postmodern context. Rather than an "issues" or "rules" -based approach, the class will focus on the key concepts, tools, and skills that students will need to clarify their own beliefs and perspectives, understand the "art" of moral reflection and discernment, and provide ethical leadership and guidance to others. This course satisfies the ethics requirement for PSR MDiv students.
This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. Full technology requirements here.
Course Credits & Cost: 3.0 credits - $1980
Course Number: CE-8147 (credit/audit)
Required Texts: Stivers, Robert L. et al. Christian Ethics:A Case Method Approach Third ed. Course Reader. Purchase here.
Syllabus: Introduction to Christian Ethics

June 4: Additional seats added for academic credit students, registration re-opened

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transTransgendering Faith: A Brief History of the Trans Movement

Offered exclusively ONLINE
Instructor: Bernard Schlager
Dates and Times: Six weeks: July 2-August 10, online
Description:
Although some see the presence of Transgender people in faith communities as a recent historical development, the truth is that persons with Trans identities have been part of the world’s religious traditions from the start. In this course we will explore the presence, voice, and witness of Transgender persons in several world religions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Buddhism.
This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. Full technology requirements here.
Course Credits & Cost: 3.0 credits - $1980; audit - $990; 4 CEUs - $700
Course Number: RSHS-8241 (credit); RSHS-0001 (CEUs)
Required Texts: Feinberg, Leslie, Transgender Warriors: Making History from Joan of Arc to RuPaul. Beacon 1996. Mollenkott, Virginia R., and Vanessa Sheridan.  Transgender Journeys. Resource 2010. Stryker, Susan.  Transgender History.  Berkeley: Seal Press, 2008.  Tanis, Justin. Trans-Gendered: Theology, Ministry, and Communities of Faith. Pilgrim 2003. Purchase here.
Required Media:  Call Me Malcolm.  Dir. Joseph Parlagreco.  Perf. Malcolm Himschoot.  2004.  Filmworks and The United Church of Christ.  DVD (purchase here) and Study Guide (free download).
Syllabus:
Transgendering Faith: A Brief History of the Trans Movement

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Hebrew text

Biblical Hebrew I

Instructor: Robert Kramish
Dates and Times: Three weeks: July 2-20 (no class on July 4), 9am - 1pm
Description:
This is the first half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources.
See also:
Biblical Hebrew II, July 23-August 10
Course Credits & Cost:
3.0 credits - $1980; audit - $990; 4 CEUs - $700
Course Number: BS-1135 (credit); BS-0001 (CEUs)
Required Texts: Allen P. Ross, Introducing Biblical Hebrew, Baker Academic, 2001. Simon, Jokelson, Kaplan, Og the Terrible, EKS, 2003. Moyes-Schnur, Vales, Og the Terrible Returns, EKS, 2003. David M. Clemens, Supplementary Exercises for Introducing Biblical Hebrew by Allen P. Ross, Regent College Publishing, 2008. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Biblical Hebrew I

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Beginning July 9

fishmosaicOld Testament Theology

Instructor: Jon Berquist
Dates and Times: One week: July 9-13, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Who is God? What does God think about people? What are God’s hopes and plans for the world? These are some of the essential questions of theology. In this course, we will go back to the beginnings – to the Old Testament, the earliest reflections on God from the Jewish, Christian, or Muslim traditions – in search of a contemporary and relevant way to answer timeless questions. Within the ancient text, we’ll find enduring insights and controversies, as a ground for our own theological search in the present contexts.
Prerequisite:
Introduction to Old Testament
Course Credits & Cost: 1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: OT-3480 (credit); OT-0001 (CEUs)
Required Texts: The Bible in a New Revised Standard Version translation (or similar). James K. Mead, Biblical Theology: Issues, Methods and Themes (WJK 2007). Gail R. O’Day and David L. Petersen, eds., Theological Bible Commentary (WJK 2009). Renita J. Weems, Battered Love: Marriage, Sex, and Violence in the Hebrew Prophets (Fortress 1995). Purchase here.
Syllabus: Old Testament Theology

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scroll imageThe Dead Sea Scrolls and Their World

Instructor: Jehon Grist
Dates and Times: One week: July 9-13, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course takes a decidedly holistic approach to understanding the scrolls in the context of their times. We'll begin with an overview of the history encompassing the scrolls, ca. 600 BCE-100 CE. From there, we'll journey from the Cairo Genizah to the Judean Desert to chronicle the story of the scrolls' discovery, and delving into current technologies used in scroll research. We'll also visit Qumran and the scroll caves to explore the physical environment of the texts and the people who produced many of them. The heart of the course will focus on a survey of the key sectarian texts and copies of biblical books found in the scroll corpus. We will study each text in English translation, with reference to Hebrew/Aramaic terms where needed. We'll also engage in the detective work of discovering the full historical and theological significance of each text, and how it contributes to our understanding of the emergence of rabbinic Judaism and Christianity. Finally, we’ll explore the 'cutting edge': current controversies and breakthroughs in scroll research.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350.
Course Number: BSHS-2617 (credit); BSHS-0002 (CEUs)
Required Text: VanderKam, James. The Dead Sea Scrolls Today, 2nd ED. Eerdsman 2010. Abegg, Flint, et all. The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible. Harper 2002. Vermes, G. The Dead Sea Scrolls in English, Rev. Ed. Penguin 2004. Purchase here.
Syllabus: Dead Sea Scrolls and Their World
Course Preview

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Lehrhaus Judaica Affiliates: to register for CEUs, email summer@psr.edu

 

truthtopowerSpeaking Truth to Power: The Minister as Public Theologian

Instructor: Hubert Locke
Dates and Times: One week: July 9-13, 9am - 1pm
Description: The role of the minister as exclusively that of tending to the spiritual needs of a congregation of believers probably vanished with the electric typewriter and carbon paper. But what has replaced [or should succeed] it? What new tasks or challenges confront today’s clergy? How does one respond effectively and authentically to a world outside the pulpit and pews that expects the clergy to afflict the comfortable as well as comfort the afflicted? This course examines the role of clergy [minister/priest/rabbi/imam] as public theologian – the community leader who speaks and responds insightfully and effectively to community issues, problems, and crises from the perspectives of religious faith and conviction, and who finds, in the process, a new and invigorating set of responsibilities for her/his daily rounds. It explores the Biblical context, the theological foundations, the political pitfalls and the social consequences of the public ministry. The course rests on the assumption that only those who are grounded in a progressive religious faith can fulfill the demands of this task.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: RS-3162 (credit); RS-0003 (CEUs)
Required Texts: no required texts, see syllabus.
Syllabus:
Speaking Truth to Power: The Minister as Public Theologian

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InterPlay

Praying the Body-The Practice of InterPlay as Soulwork

Instructor: Cynthia Winton-Henry
Dates and Times:
One weeks: July 9-13, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Seeking to deepen embodied connection with the Divine? Cynthia Winton-Henry assists leaders around the world to befriend the mystery of body and soul. Based on research done at Pacific School of Religion she and Phil Porter crafted the philosophy and practice of InterPlay to unlock the wisdom of the body. Today people in churches, cathedrals, synagogues, classrooms, hospitals and churches use InterPlay in their creative and spiritual journey.
With the body at theological center, this course illuminates how diverse methods of embodied prayer illuminate our different aspects of our relationship with the divine. Explore how body wisdom liberates the joy and possibility that prayer can be fun. Learn how five modalities of soul making: movement, voice, word, stillness, and connections allow spirit to move as it did in ancient, more embodied days.
Delve into embodying prayers for different occasions, ways to heal, and listen to the holy in new and surprising ways.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: RS-2034 (credit); RA-0006 (CEUs)

Required Texts: Winton-Henry, Cynthia. Dance: The Sacred Art: Rediscovering the Joy of Movement as Spiritual Practice. Woodstock: Skylight Paths International, 2010. Some, Malidone, Tarcher/Putnam, Jeremy P. The Healing Wisdon of Africa: Finding Life Purpose through Nature Ritual and Community. New York: Penguin Putnam Inc., 1999. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Praying the Body-The Practice of InterPlay as Soulwork

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Begining July 16

library booksThe Art and Technique of Effective Academic Writing

Offered exclusively ONLINE
Instructor: Elizabeth Ritter-Conn
Dates and Times: Three weeks: July 16 - August 3
Description:
This writing course is designed to orient students to the primary types of academic writing they will be asked to do during their years at PSR and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU), including reflection papers, research papers, critical essays and exegetical papers. The course is intended to help students learn or “dust off” the writing skills they will need to succeed academically while in seminary.
Through online lectures and discussions, extensive exercises, and brief homework assignments, participants will learn the art and technique of composing critical writing in a U.S. academic setting. Among other topics, this course will cover: developing a topic; identifying reliable resources; reading and note-taking; constructing a thesis; writing and revising the outline, body, introduction and conclusion of a paper; formatting footnotes and bibliography; and preparing an audience-oriented summary of a paper. Participants will also learn how to identify and use the online resources of the GTU library. Finally, the course will introduce PSR’s Plagiarism Policy and will offer students strategies for avoiding plagiarism.
This ONLINE course meets asynchronously using Moodle. It has no required meeting times. High-speed internet connection required. Full technology requirements here.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: IDS-8100 (credit); IDS-0001 (CEUs)
Required Text: Turabian, Kate L.: A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers (7th Ed.). University of Chicago 2007. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
The Art and Technique of Effective Academic Writing

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WritingAloneCreative Writing Workshop

Instructor: Pat Schneider
Dates and Times: One week: July 16-20, 9am - 1pm
Description:
The purpose of this workshop is twofold: to enable the artist in each person to become more free and more able to write, and to model a methodology for using writing to create a healing community. There are no required readings or papers for this workshop. Limited to 12 students.
There will also be a showing of the internationally award-winning film, Tell Me Something I Can't Forget, followed by a discussion of using writing to empower the silenced. Open to the public; details TBA.
Course Credits & Cost:
(special price) 1.5 credits - $990; audit - $990; 2 CEUs - $990 (updated 3/19/12)
Course Number: RA-3700 (credit); RA-0001 (CEUs)
Required Text: Schneider, Pat: Writing Alone and With Others.Oxford University 2003. See syllabus for optional texts. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Creative Writing Workshop

THIS COURSE IS FULL.  You may join the waitlist and the Summer Session office will contact you if an opening arises.

 

Spong Reclaiming book coverRe-Claiming the Bible in a Post-Christian World

Instructor: John Shelby Spong
Dates and Times: One week: July 16-20, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Can the Bible, written 2000-3000 years ago, speak in any meaningful way to the 21st century? If it cannot, then is Christianity at an end? If it can, will Christianity look anything like what we have known in the past? Since creeds and doctrines are all constructed on the basis of what was believed to be "Biblical Truth," can any of the current formularies stand? Since liturgy is based on biblical definitions of sin, salvation and God, none of which make much sense to 21st century people, can Christianity tolerate the revolution that it faces? This class will be taught by one who has been a priest and bishop for 56 years with one foot in the institutional church and the other in the academic world of new insights. It is specifically designed for clergy and questing lay people.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: BS-2117 (credit); BS-0003 (CEUs)
Required Text: John Shelby Spong, Re-Claiming the Bible in a Non-Religious World, 2011 HarperCollins, San Francisco. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Re-Claiming the Bible in a Post-Christian World

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Obama CrossOne Nation Under God?: Race, Religion and Politics

Instructor: Karen Yonemoto
Dates and Times: Two weeks: July 16-27, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course will address how race and religion have served as a force for unity, division, and change in the United States. We specifically highlight the ways in which religious communities and communities of color have impacted the nation through their participation in electoral, ethical, and civic practices. To this end the class explores how race and religion inform Church-State relations, the American presidency, notions of civil religion, and American political life. We also address how religious ideologies, symbols, texts, and narratives are incorporated and employed as strategies and mechanisms for social change among African American, Asian American, Latino/a, American Indian and Jewish American communities. Key social movements, debates around social and ethical policies, and evaluative differences between social service and social justice models are also discussed.

Course cancelled owing to low enrollment.  We hope to offer it again in the future.

 

Beginning July 23

Jordan - Cotton Patch book coverRadical Jesus in the Cotton Patch

Instructor: Dorsey Blake
Dates and Times: One week: July 23-27, 9am - 1pm
Description:
The course will engage the life and works of Clarence Jordan, scientific farmer and New Testament Greek scholar. Jordan is the author of the Cotton Patch Series of Versions of New Testament texts.  We will focus on his parables of liberation.  Jordan felt that it was imperative to contextualize the parables of Jesus as narratives speaking directly to conditions in the United States: Jerusalem became Atlanta; crucifixion became lynching.  His texts audaciously and brilliantly address racism, militarism, economic justice, sustainability, the nonviolent revolution beckoning to be born and the spirituality underlying all of this. The course will also examine his work: The Substance of Faith.  This marvelous book presents many contemporary issues --  militarism, racism, economic exploitation, anxiety, insecurity, confusion – hypocrisy – that the Kingdom (reign, sovereignty) of God idea addresses. Clarence Jordan spoke directly with great humor and earthiness. In 1942 he co-founded the interracial farming community “Koinonia” in Americus, Georgia. It was an example of his commitment to seeing the Word made flesh.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: RSSP-4700 (credit); RSSP-0001 (CEUs)
Required Texts: Jordan, Clarence and Doulos, Bill Lane, Cotton Patch Parables of Liberation, Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1976. Sermon of the Mount, Valley Forge, PA: Judson Press, 1952. Purchase here.
Optional Texts:
Hollyday, Joyce: Essential Writings, Orbis 2001. Jordan, Clarence: Sermon on the Mount. Judson 2009. Barnett, Henlee: Clarence Jordan: Turning Dreams Into Deeds. Smyth & Helwys 1992. Cable, Ann Louise: Cotton Patch for The Kingdom: Clarence Jordan's Demonstration Plot. Herald Press 2001. Weiner, Kay: Koinonia Remembered: The First Fifty Years. Koinonia Partners 1992. Jeremias, Joachim: Parables of Jesus. Charles Scribner's Sons 1966. Scott, Brandon: Hear Then the Parable. Fortress 1989. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Radical Jesus in the Cotton Patch

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Lentz Christ of MaryknollPreaching Liberation

Instructor: Donna Allen
Dates and Times: One week: July 23-27, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Preaching Liberation will explore the theory and hermeneutics that inform liberation theology with particular focus on the implications for preaching. The course is designed to develop a process for preaching with emphasis on liberation theology for the novice or seasoned preacher. Students will have an opportunity to preach in class. The methodology for sermon construction will include ‘listening’ or perceiving liberation in diverse cultural context through a critical examination of four movies, “In Time”, “La Mission”, “Rain” and “The Encounter”. The premise of the course is that as we listen for liberation in sacred text and the lived experience we learn the language of liberation and can therefore preach it with authenticity and transformative power.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: HM-2731 (credit); HM-0002 (CEUs)
Required Texts: Bergant, Diane. Israel's Wisdom Literature: A Liberation-Critical Reading. Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 1997. Floyd-Thomas, Stacy M and Pinn, Anthony B. Liberation Theologies in the United States: An Introduction. New York, London: New York University Press, 2010. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Preaching Liberation
Image is Lentz's "Christ of Maryknoll".

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journal with ink pen

Writing as a Healing Ministry

Instructor: Sharon Bray
Dates and Times: One week: July 23-27, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Writing is an art form that belongs to every one of us. It is also a powerful tool for healing. In recent years, a growing body of research shows that the simple act of writing down thoughts and feelings helps people with chronic illness improve their health. But the healing power of writing extends well beyond physical illness. Writing also reduces stress, discharges complex emotions and helps us gain perspective. When we suffer pain or loss, writing about our feelings can help to relieve our burdens, establish a perspective, and cope more effectively with life’s hardships. Writing helps us integrate our physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. It can be a kind of prayer—one in which you don't ask for anything, except to know your own experience and to make meaning of it.
“Writing as a Healing Ministry” is designed to provide an overview of the field of therapeutic or healing writing for lay ministers, clergy, healthcare or helping professionals. In this intensive week-long course, we will explore how writing can heal ourselves and others. Class activities will include an overview of the research on therapeutic writing, review of several different writing methodologies used to help individuals heal from pain, suffering and trauma, small group discussion and individual writing exercises.
Course Credits & Cost:
1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $350
Course Number: SP-2988 (credit); SP-0001 (CEUs)
Required Text: see syllabus. Purchase here.
Syllabus: Writing as a Healing Ministry

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Hebrew text

Biblical Hebrew II

Instructor: Robert Kramish
Dates and Times: Three weeks: July 23-August 10, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This is the second half of a six-week intensive course in which students will work through an entire first-year Hebrew grammar book, preparing them to enter an Intermediate Hebrew class upon completion of the course. Students who plan to take the entire course should sign up for both Hebrew I and Hebrew II. By the end of the two-part course, students will have acquired a command of the basic principles of Hebrew phonology, morphology and syntax. Students will be able to translate the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexicons and other grammatical resources.
See also:
Biblical Hebrew I, July 2-20
Course Credits & Cost:
3.0 credits - $1980; audit - $990; 4 CEUs - $700
Course Number: BS-1136 (credit); BS-0002 (CEUs)
Required Texts: Allen P. Ross, Introducing Biblical Hebrew, Baker Academic, 2001. David M. Clemens, Supplementary Exercises for Introducing Biblical Hebrew by Allen P. Ross, Regent College, 2008. F. Brown, S. Driver, and C. Briggs, The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon Hendrickson, 2005. A. Alt et al., editors Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, Stuttgart: Deutsche ibelgesellschaft, 1997. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
Biblical Hebrew II

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Beginning July 30

CPR logoreNEW: Skills for Leading New and Renewing Progressive Churches

Instructors: Cameron Trimble and Michael Piazza
Dates and Times: One week: July 30-August 3, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course, designed and presented by the co-founders of the Center for Progressive Renewal, teaches practical skills for starting a new progressive church or leading the renewal of a church that is stagnant or in decline. It is designed around the premise that churches are rarely resurrected, but can be born again, hence the skills needed in both situations are very similar: creating compelling vision, an effective communication strategy, data management, community development, external mission, transformational worship, and more.
Course Credits & Cost:
(special price) 1.5 credits - $990; audit - $495; 2.0 CEUs - $549 (scholarships available through CPR)
Course Number: FT-2517 (credit);
Required Text: Dresher, Elizabeth. Tweet If You Love Jesus, Morehouse Publishing, 2011. Leas, Speed. Discovering Your Conflict Management Style, Alban Institute, 1998. Piazza, Mike and Cameron Trimble. Liberating Hope: Daring to Renew the Mainline Church,  Pilgrim Press, 2011. Tickle, Phyllis. The Great Emergence, Baker Books, 2008. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
reNEW

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SPECIAL PROCESS to register for CEUs: Register for CEUs with the Center for Progressive Renewal

 

Johnson - Queer ReligionLGBTQ Histories and Theologies for Ministry

Instructors: Jay Johnson and Bernard Schlager
Dates and Times: One week: July 30-August 3, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course will provide an historical overview of non-conforming sexual identities and practices beginning with ancient Greco-Roman sensibilities and continuing through to the emergence of “homosexuality” in the 19th century and eventually lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. These sexual histories will be considered in relation both to institutional Christianity and wider cultural realities. We will also consider how proactive, constructive forms of Christian theology rooted in LGBT and queer sensibilities were constructed in the latter half of the 20th century, especially with a view toward contemporary theological trends and their implications for Christian ministry today.
This course will meet as a week-long intensive, Monday through Friday, 9:00am-1:00pm during the 2012 Summer Session at Pacific School of Religion. (This course will also fulfill particular ordination requirements for MCC students.)

Course cancelled owing to low enrollment.  We hope to offer it again in the future.

 

Environmentalism in American Religion and Culture

Instructor: Devin Zuber
Dates and Times: Two weeks: July 30-August 10, 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course surveys the the history of American environmentalism, with a particular focus on the ways American religious discourse has shaped varying conceptions of nature. We will cover the impact of European colonization in the "new" world; the Romantic turn to nature for spiritual authority that emerged out of contests between religion and science; the appearance of conservation and preservation movements at the turn of the 20th century. Special attention will be given to the Bay Area legacy of John Muir and his still-influential "spiritualization" of wilderness and the wild. There will be several field-trips to locations that are significant for the history of Bay Area environmentalism (such as Muir Woods), as well as visits to/from non-profit organizations in San Francisco who are engaging communities of faith around issues of ecological justice.
Course Credits & Cost:
3.0 credits - $1980; audit - $990; 4 CEUs - $700
Course Number: HSST-2541 (credit); HSST-0003 (CEUs)
Required Text: Thoreau, Henry David: Walden;Or, Life in the Woods. Dover, 1995. Purchase here.
Syllabus:
coming soon

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THE CHI OF ORGANIZING, watercolor on rag paper,  Juana Alicia ©2000, 16” x 20Community Organizing for Health & Social Justice

Instructor: Vivian Chavez
Dates and Times: Two weeks: July 30-August 10, 9am - 1pm
Description:
Community Organizing for health & social justice is a learning experience based on the concept of cultural humility and the practice of kinesthetic awareness to engage with diversity. Cultural humility is a lifelong commitment to self-reflection, redressing power imbalances, and developing and maintaining mutually respectful dynamic partnerships based on mutual trust. Students will practice basic qualitative research that examines a community of their choice, interview community members and integrate course readings. The goal is to create a safe space for dialogue and practice as well as build a “community of identity” among class members. Communication (verbal/non-verbal) and leadership will be explored as participants work in teams to co-teach a segment of the class. Participants will learn how to facilitate dialogue using a wide range of methods modeled by the instructor, from multi-media presentations to group discussions, role-plays, and activities that engage the senses. Our class will become a community focused on understanding and addressing power imbalances via developing mutually beneficial non-paternalistic partnerships. Resiliency and social support will be examined through the lens of prevention, social justice and human rights. Skills in “media advocacy” and nonviolence will be introduced with awareness of food security and the built environment as central themes. In addition, the class will be invited to engage with the concepts of embodied leadership and global knowledge/local action.
(image: THE CHI OF ORGANIZING, watercolor on rag paper, Juana Alicia ©2000, 16” x 20")

Course cancelled owing to low enrollment.  We hope to offer it again in the future.

 

Beginning August 6

MCC logoMCC History and Polity

Instructor: Terri Echelbarger
Dates and Times: Three days: August 6-8 (Monday-Wednesday), 9am - 1pm
Description:
This course will consider the history, structure and governance of Metropolitan Community Churches (MCC) as well as the values, theologies, and cultures that have shaped and continue to shape MCC. In addition to the reading, lectures, and class discussions, guests will provide additional perspectives. Evaluation includes papers, daily reading quizzes and a final project. A course in MCC History and Polity is required for MCC ordination
Course Credits & Cost:
1.0 credits - $660; audit - $330; 1.5 CEUs - $262.50
Course Number: HSFT-2065 (credit); HSFT-0001 (CEUs)

Course cancelled owing to low enrollment.  We hope to offer it again in the future.

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    We reserve the right to change course descriptions, instructors, dates and hours of instruction, meeting places, and prices. In the event of a conflict between printed material and information on this Web site, the information on this Web site takes precedence. Please contact the Summer Session Office for any questions regarding cancelled courses. Before registering please ensure that you have read the information included on the Registration and Logistics page [coming soon], including information about refunds.